Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations

Conferences & Workshops Details

 
Multi-Country Research Dialogue on
Emerging Economies in the New World Order: Promises, Pitfalls and Prioritie
 
The Claridges, New Delhi, India
April 12 – 13, 2010

Programme
 
Monday, April 12, 2010
09:00-09:30 Registration
09:30-10:30 Inaugural Session

Word of Welcome:
Dr. Rajiv KUMAR, Director & CE, ICRIER

Special Address: 
Dr. Rohinton MEDHORA, Vice President-Programs, International Development Research Centre (IDRC)

Inaugural Address:
Mr. Montek Singh AHLUWALIA, Deputy Chairman, Planning Commission, Government of India

Conference Overview and Vote of Thanks:
Prof. Amit RAY, Chair Professor of Trade, Technology and Competitiveness, ICRIER

10:30-11:00 Tea/Coffee
11:00-13:00 Dialogue I: Agriculture, Food Security and Livelihood
Chair: Professor Abhijit SEN, Member, Planning Commission, Government of India and Professor, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
Key Panelists: 
Dr. Tengku ARIFF (Malaysia)
Prof. Antonio BUAINAIN (Brazil)
Prof. Anthony IKPI (Nigeria)
Prof. Huang JIKUN (China) 
Dr. Surabhi MITTAL (India)
Prof. Antonio YUNEZ-NAUDE (Mexico)
Rapporteur:
Dr. Subhanil CHOWDHURY, ICRIER
13:00-14:30 Lunch
14:30-16:30 Dialogue II: Technology and Innovation
Chair: Dr. Rajiv KUMAR, Director & CE, ICRIER
Key Panelists:
Prof. Jose CASSIOLATO (Brazil)
Prof. Mario CIMOLI (Chile)
Prof. Banji OYELARAN-OYEYINKA (Kenya) 
Prof. Rajah RASIAH (Malaysia)
Prof. Amit RAY (India)
Rapporteur
Mr. Sabyasachi SAHA, ICRIER
16:30-17:00 Tea/Coffee
19:00 Cocktails and Dinner
Tuesday, April 13, 2010
9:00-11:00 Dialogue III: Energy, Environment and Climate Change [Download]
Chair: Mr. Nitin DESAI, Honorary Professor, ICRIER
Key Panelists:
Dr. David FIG (South Africa)
Prof. Jose MOREIRA (Brazil) 
Dr. Meeta MEHRA and Dr. Aparna SAWHNEY (India)
Dr. Tarek H. SELIM (Egypt)
Rapporteur:
Ms. Sirjjan PREET, ICRIER
11:00-11:30 Tea/Coffee
11:30-13:30 Dialogue IV: Health
Chair:
 Dr. Rohinton MEDHORA, Vice President-Programs, Canada’s International Development Research Centre
Key Panelists
Dr. Wiku ADISASMITO (Indonesia)
Prof. K Srinath REDDY (India)
Prof. Claudio SAPELLI (Chile)
Rapporteur
Dr. Alamuru SOUMYA, ICRIER
13:30-15:00 Lunch
15:00-16:30 CONCLUDING SESSION [Download]

Chair:
 Dr. Yu YONGDING, Director, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, Beijing, China

Highlights of the Four Dialogues:
Prof. Amit RAY, Chair Professor, ICRIER 
Dr. Subhanil CHOWDHURY, ICRIER
Mr. Sabyasachi SAHA, ICRIER 
Ms. Sirjjan PREET, ICRIER
Dr. Alamuru SOUMYA, ICRIER

Discussion

Final Comments:
Dr. Stephen McGURK, Regional Director, IDRC Regional Office for South Asia and China
Dr. Rajiv KUMAR, Director & CE, ICRIER

16:30-17:00 Tea/Coffee

Panelists
  1. Dr. Wiku ADISASMITO, 
    Department of Health Policy & Administration,
    Faculty of Public Health,
    University of Indonesia, 
    Depok, Indonesia
  2. Dr. Rajeev ANANTARAM, 
    Senior Fellow, ICRIER, New Delhi, India
  3. Dr. Tengku ARIFF, 
    Director, Economic and Technology Management Research Centre, 
    Malaysian Agricultural Research and Development Institute (MARDI), 
    Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
  4. Dr. Praveen ARORA, 
    Director, Department of Science and Technology
    Govt. of India
  5. Prof. Pulapre BALAKRISHNAN, 
    Centre for International Trade and Development, 
    Jawaharlal Nehru University
    New Delhi, India
  6. Dr. Saradindu BHADURI, 
    Centre for Studies in Science Policy,
    Jawaharlal Nehru University, 
    New Delhi, India
  7. Prof. Antonio BUAINAIN, 
    Professor of Economics, Instituto de Economia, 
    State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), 
    Sao Paulo, Brazil
  8. Prof. Jose CASSIOLATO, 
    Instituto de Economia, 
    Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  9. Prof. G K CHADHA, 
    CEO, South Asian University, New Delhi, India
    (Formerly), Member, Prime Minister’s Economic Advisory Council, Government of India
  10. Mr. Javid CHOWDHURY, 
    (Formerly), Secretary, Ministry of Health, 
    Govt of India
  11. Prof. Mario CIMOLI, 
    Division on Production, Productivity and Management, 
    Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) 
    Santiago, Chile.
  12. Dr. David FIG, 
    Chairman, BioWatch, 
    South Africa
  13. Prof. Anup GHOSH. 
    Associate Dean (Industrial R&D), 
    Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi
    New Delhi, India
  14. Dr. Prodipto GHOSH
    Distinguished fellow
    TERI, New Delhi, India
  15. Prof. Anthony IKPI, 
    Department of Agricultural Economics, 
    University of Ibadan, 
    Nigeria 
  16. Prof. Huang JIKUN, 
    Director and Professor, 
    Centre for Chinese Agricultural Policy, 
    Chinese Academy of Sciences, 
    Beijing, China
  17. Prof. Rajat KATHURIA, 
    ICRIER
    New Delhi, India
  18. Dr. Rajiv KUMAR, 
    Director and CE, ICRIER
    New Delhi, India
  19. Dr. Stephen McGURK
    Regional Director, 
    IDRC Regional Office for South Asia and China
    New Delhi, India
  20. Dr. Meeta MEHRA 
    Centre for International Trade and Development, 
    Jawaharlal Nehru University, 
    New Delhi India
  21. Dr. Surabhi MITTAL, 
    Senior Fellow, ICRIER, New Delhi, India
  22. Prof. Jose MOREIRA, 
    Brazilian Reference Center on Biomass, 
    Institute of Electrotechnology and Energy, 
    University of Sao Paulo, Brazil
  23. Mr. Alok MUKHOPADHYAY, 
    CEO, Voluntary Health Association of India
    New Delhi, India 
  24. Prof. (Dr.) Lalit NATH, 
    (Formerly) Professor of Public Health and Director, 
    All India Institute of Medical Sciences
    New Delhi, India
  25. Mr. Shrawan NIGAM, 
    ICRIER, New Delhi, India
  26. Dr. Ligia NORONHA
    TERI, New Delhi, India
  27. Prof. Banji OYELARAN-OYEYINKA, 
    Director, Monitoring and Research Division, 
    UN-HABITAT, Kenya 
    and Professorial Fellow, UNU-MERIT
  28. Dr. Rajeswari RAINA, 
    NISTADS
    New Delhi, India
  29. Prof. Rajah RASIAH, 
    Faculty of Economics and Administration, 
    University of Malaya, 
    Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
  30. Prof. Amit RAY, 
    Chair Professor of Trade Technology and Competitiveness, ICRIER, 
    Professor of Economics, Centre for International Trade and Development,
    Jawaharlal Nehru University, 
    New Delhi, India
  31. Prof. K Srinath REDDY, 
    President, Public Health Foundation of India (PHFI), 
    New Delhi, India
  32. Prof. Claudio SAPELLI, 
    Instituto de Economia, 
    Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, 
    Santiago, Chile
  33. Dr. Aparna SAWHNEY, 
    Centre for International Trade and Development, 
    Jawaharlal Nehru University, 
    New Delhi India
  34. Dr. Tarek H. SELIM, 
    Department of Economics, 
    American University in Cairo, 
    Egypt
  35. Prof. Ramprasad SENGUPTA, 
    Centre for Economic Studies and Planning,
    Jawaharlal Nehru University
    New Delhi, India
  36. Prof. Ravi SRIVASTAVA, 
    Centre for Studies in Regional Development
    Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India
  37. Prof. Antonio YUNEZ-NAUDE, 
    Director, Centro de Esttudios Economicos, 
    El Colegio de Mexico, 
    Mexico City, Mexico

List of Papers
Dialogue I: Agriculture, Food Security and Livelihood
  1. Dr. Tengku ARIFF, Director, Economic and Technology Management Research Centre, Malaysian Agricultural Research and Development Institute (MARDI), Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
    Dimensions of Food and Livelihood Security of Agricultural Trade: The Case of Malaysia
  2. Prof. Antonio BUAINAIN, Professor of Economics, Instituto de Economia, State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Sao Paulo,Brazil
    Recent Development Patterns of Brazilian Agriculture
  3. Prof. Anthony IKPI, Department of Agricultural Economics, University of Ibadan, Nigeria 
    Nigeria’s Policy Concerns and Issues of Global Governance in Agriculture and Food Security
  4. Prof. Huang JIKUN, Director and Professor, Centre for Chinese Agricultural Policy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
    China’s Agricultural Performance with Specific Focus on the Roles of Institutional Reform Technology Change and Trade Liberalization
  5. Dr. Surabhi MITTAL, Senior Fellow, ICRIER, New Delhi, India
    Agriculture, Food Security and Livelihood: India paper
  6. Prof. Antonio YUNEZ-NAUDE, Director, Centro de Esttudios Economicos, El Colegio de Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico 
    Liberalizing the Agricultural Sector: The Experience of Mexico” 
Dialogue II: Technology and Innovation
  1. Prof. Jose CASSIOLATO, Instituto de Economia, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
    Dynamics of the Brazilian Innovation System
  2. Prof. Mario CIMOLI, Division on Production, Productivity and Management, ECLAC, Santiago, Chile.
    Uncovering Innovation Dynamics and Development Processes: A Mexican Perspective
  3. Prof. Banji OYELARAN-OYEYINKA, Director, Monitoring and Research Division, UN-HABITAT, Kenya and Professorial Fellow, UNU-MERIT
    Innovation Systems in Latecomer Development
  4. Prof. Rajah RASIAH, Faculty of Economics and Administration, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
    The Role of the Diaspora in building National Innovation Systems: The Experience of India, Malaysia and Taiwan
  5. Prof. Amit RAY, Chair Professor of Trade Technology and Competitiveness, ICRIER, and Professor of Economics, Centre for International Trade and Development, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India
    Perspectives on Public Funded Research for Technological Development: Insights from India’s Technology Trajectory
Dialogue III: Energy, Environment and Climate Change
Summary

Introduction
The populous, fast-growing emerging economies of Brazil, China, Egypt, India and South Africa face daunting challenges on the energy, environment and climate change fronts. These five countries accounted for 42 percent of the global population in 2008 but only 26 percent of global energy supply. CO2 emissions per unit of energy are lowest for Brazil, way below the global average, whilst China’s energy mix is more CO2 emitting than the global average. Emissions in the other three countries are around the global average. Energy consumption in these countries is growing and with economic growth and higher populations, the demand for energy will grow even higher. The pressure on these countries to reduce their dependence on energy imports and to reduce CO2 emissions will increase the attractiveness of renewable energy sources in these countries.

Energy Mix
The five countries under consideration have different resources and problems and associated approaches to developing renewable sources of energy. Whilst China, India and South Africa are largely dependent on coal, Brazil uses a lot of hydropower and ethanol from sugarcane. Egypt, which uses mainly oil and gas, is running short of oil. The dependence on imports of oil and energy resources in general is significant for these countries. Brazil launched its ethanol programme in the 1970s when its oil import bill rose dramatically. Although Egypt has been a net oil exporter, it fears that it will soon need to import oil. Thus, all these countries have their own compulsions to push for the development of renewable and cleaner sources of energy.

Approaches to developing renewable energy
There are commonalities and differences in the approaches that these countries have followed to deal with their perceived problems in the context of their own resource base. Moreira (2010) argues that Brazil’s strategy for clean and renewable energy is based on its vast land and water resources. Forty-six percent of its primary energy in 2007 was from renewable resources. Gao (2010) describes three targets of China’s energy policies: reducing energy intensity of GDP by 20 percent over2006-20; increasing share of non-hydrocarbon sources to 15 percent by 2020 and reducing carbon emissions intensity of GDP by 40-45 percent over 2005-20. Given that more than 90 percent of energy came from hydrocarbons in 2008, of which 69 percent, this appears to be a big challenge. According to Selim (2010), Egypt, which has been an oil exporter, faces a problem different from other emerging economies. Oil production has been declining over the past decade and the country became a net oil importer in 2008. However, the country has discovered large gas reserves and shifted from oil to natural gas. Egypt is ranked third in consumption of natural gas with around 88 percent of total electricity being generated from natural gas and remaining from 12 percent coming from the Aswan high Dam. India’s energy problems arise from meager oil and gas resources, small wind power potential, limited resources of hydropower and scarcity of land and water couples with a fast growing economy and large and increasing population. India’s clean energy options in the medium term are improving energy efficiency and rapidly developing renewables that are economical today. The Indian government has initiated a number of policy measures to promote renewable energy. Fig (2010) discusses the adoption of renewable energy sources in South Africa. South Africa has no oil, little gas and low hydro potential and is largely dependent on coal with 200 years worth of reserves. Despite its plentiful access to wind and solar energy, South Africa has till date concentrated on fossil fuel development like many other countries. South Arica has announced a target of 10000 GWhr, about 4 percent of current energy generated from renewable resources by 2013. According to Fig, the development of renewable energy in the country suffers from fragmentation of responsibilities for the energy sector among different ministries, a situation similar to that in India, where eight ministries look after the energy sector.

Insights from country studies
The studies reveal that energy policies, issues and strategies of the countries are dominated by their resource base. Brazil with its abundant land and water resources has promoted hydropower and sugarcane-based ethanol. China, India and South Africa are centered on coal and the former two countries recognize the need to shift away from coal and have strong programmes to promote energy efficiency and clean and renewable source of energy. South Africa, however, is only “reluctantly embracing” renewables. Egypt, however, has experienced no compulsion until now to promote renewable energy – not even solar – and is more concerned with about how to make the transition from oil, whose price has been kept at low level, to natural gas.

Conclusions
The emerging economies research dialogue on energy indicated that sector strategies and policies in these countries were driven by their desire for energy security and to reduce their dependence on imported energy as well as concerns of climate change. As a result, generation of energy from domestic renewable energy sources was found to be a very attractive strategy. Promoting energy efficiency that reduces the need for energy in the first place was deemed an even more attractive policy. 

References:

Fig, David. “Reluctant Embrace: South Africa and Renewable Energy” paper presented at the research dialogue on Emerging Economies in the New World Order: Promises, Pitfalls and Priorities April 12-13 2010, New Delhi.

Gao, Shinxian. “China’s Energy: Present Situation and it’s Policies” paper prepared for the research dialogue on Emerging Economies in the New World Order: Promises, Pitfalls and Priorities April 12-13 2010, New Delhi.

Moreira, Jose. “Brazilian Perspective on Clean Energy” paper presented at the research dialogue on Emerging Economies in the New World Order: Promises, Pitfalls and Priorities April 12-13 2010, New Delhi.

Parikh, Kirit. “Approaches to the Development of Renewable and Clean Energy in Brazil, China, Egypt, India and South Africa: Lessons for Emerging Countries” 2011

Sawhney, Aparna and Meeta Mehra “Indian Perspective on Clean Energy and Energy Efficiency” paper presented at the research dialogue on Emerging Economies in the New World Order: Promises, Pitfalls and Priorities April 12-13 2010, New Delhi.

Selim, Tarek. “Towards A New Energy and Environmental Policy for Egypt: Development of Clean Sources in An Emerging Economy” paper presented at the research dialogue on Emerging Economies in the New World Order: Promises, Pitfalls and Priorities April 12-13 2010, New Delhi.

  • This summary is based on Kirit S. Parikh (2011) review of the papers prepared for the first Emerging Economies Research Dialogue, “Emerging Economies in the New World Order: Promises, Pitfalls and Priorities,” 12-13 April, New Delhi.
  •  

    Dialogue IV: Health
    1. Dr. Wiku ADISASMITO, Department of Health Policy & Administration, Faculty of Public Health, University of Indonesia, Depok, Indonesia
      Resilient to Emerging Infectious Diseases: National, Regional and Global Concerns
    2. Prof. K Srinath REDDY, President, Public Health Foundation of India (PHFI), New Delhi, India
      Post H1N1 Pandemic: Time to Introspect, Scrutinise and be Honest
    3. Prof. Claudio SAPELLI, Instituto de Economia, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago, Chile
      Lessons for the Design of a System of Health Care Provision and Financing from the Chilean Experience

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